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I Had Trouble in Getting to Big Easy

The day started out rotten.  Up at 4 a.m. (okay, well 4:30), only to miss my flight to New Orleans, despite my best efforts.  Made it all the way to JFK, raced inside like a lunatic, wheeled luggage flying behind me, only to find out I’d have to pay an additional $80 for the next flight this afternoon, couldn’t check my bags until at least after 1:00, and would have to trek it back home in the meantime to wait (which meant another $100 in cab fare to get home and back again later).  Sooooooo, while still in a spectacularly foul mood, I headed out back to check on the garden.

I had major renovations done on my house in the last six months.  I find that when I’m in a good mood I look at the changes and am pleased as punch I laid out the money for it.  When I’m grumpy, I see the tiniest nicks and chips in the new paint or corner spots where the moulding isn’t perfectly straight, or that infuriating little dribble of paint that hardened under the counter ledge in the opening between the dining room and kitchen, and think about the dollars wasted.  This morning I found the same phenomenon occurs in the garden.  I went out there and all I saw were the problems.  Although the first heirloom tomato ripened, this morning all I could see was the split at the top.  While the peach tree is producing lots of fruit despite some early season troubles, all I saw this morning were problems that I don’t remember being there a few days ago.  (In May, I sprayed it with copper fungicide but not in the amount Shannon’s recommended — I try to go easy with that stuff even thought it’s organic.  It’s still copper being sprayed on a tree that produces fruit I fully intend to eat.)

So, although I didn’t skip through the garden this morning, peppering self-congratulations, I did identify some problems that need fixing.  Of course, my mood is a little improved after getting up close and personal with the plants; that never fails.  Eternal happiness and sprightliness, however, can be a dangerous thing.  I don’t know that I would have spotted those issues if I weren’t such a grumpy gardener this morning.

I do feel like the guy in Dr. Seuss’ I Had Trouble In Getting to Solla Sollew.  He left all the pesky troubles he was having at home to get to the beautiful city of Solla Sollew (on the banks oft he beautiful River Wah-hoo, where they never have troubles, at least very few), but found that the journey wasn’t quite as easy as he had expected.  After an exhausting bout of difficulties getting to SS, he arrives to find that the city is suffering from a key-slapping slippard who moved into the door, and now no one can get in and no one can get out.  The town’s gone to pot and even the ever loyal doorman has decided to leave, off to the City of Boola Boo Ball, where they never have troubles, no troubles at all.  So, while I’d really like to kick off this vacation with a bloody mary, fixins courtesy of the garden, and chill till my flight at 3, I’ve decided to follow dude’s suggestions.

Declining the doorman’s invitation to follow him off to paradise, he tells us what he has decided to do:

…I started back home, to the Valey of Vung.  I know I’ll have troubles.  I’ll, maybe, get stung.  I’ll always have troubles.  I’ll, maybe, get bit by that green-headed Quail on the place where I sit.  But I’ve bought a big bat.  I’m all ready, you see.  Now my troubles are going to have troubles with me!

Watch out ants.  I’m going to Shannon’s to buy my big bat.

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2 responses to “I Had Trouble in Getting to Big Easy

  1. Man – gotta love them bats. 🙂 Great blog today. The happy versus hapless home repair feeling stuff – priceless.

  2. Ralph ⋅

    Reading the post reminded me of something I haven’t read for many years, the I Ching. It has many cryptical references to travel. So- I consulted The Oracle (sorry, Google not the book itself) and from

    http://www.psychic-revelation.com/reference/i_l/i_ching/hexagram56.html

    Came up with this:
    ————————————————-

    Interpreting The I Ching – Hexagram 56 Lu

    I Ching Hexagram: 56
    Name: Lu.

    Keyphrase: The wanderer.

    Formed By The Trigrams: Fire over Mountain.

    General: You will travel best when your journey is a quest rather than a holiday or an escape.

    Love: Travel will help provide something that is lacking in your relationship provided the journey is not being used as a means of escape.

    Business: Travel is necessary to help provide something that is lacking in your business. It is a time tact and diplomacy.

    Personal: Travel can be used as a means of gaining knowledge in an area that is lacking.

    Overview: Lu represents a time in your life when you feel the need to travel. There is a feeling that something is missing and now is a good time for you to undertake a quest to find out what. Lu is also a reminder that when moving into unfamiliar territory it is wise to tactful and courteous. Just because you do things differently to others doesn’t mean you are right and they are wrong. Be aware of differences in customs and behavior and act accordingly. Lu should not be seen as a time to take a trip to escape from difficulties but as a time to gain knowledge.

    ————————————————————————
    Well, I didn’t get this hexagram from sticks or coins, so if doesn’t apply ignore it. Google doesn’t know everything!

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