The Storms: Death and Destruction, Help, Hope and Recovery

While counts of the toll the two storms that hit the northeast in recent weeks continue toward a final tally, people of the area busy themselves donating to others still in need, waiting in gas lines, resuming (or trying) semblances of normal in their work and personal lives, while others wait for electricity and struggle to stay warm. 400,865 homes in the eastern U.S. remain without power as of yesterday.  The least fortunate of us trudge the long uphill road of grieving lost loved ones. For those, the pain will last long past the clean up crews and news media. For those, the recovery never really ends. The death toll of victims in the U.S. has reached 120. At last count, it was close to 70 victims in the Caribbean, hitting Haiti (52 fatalities) the hardest.

Flashes of hope of the basic compassion of humanity are present in the vast relief efforts underway. From local long-standing businesses such as Two Boots Brooklyn, organizing food and clothing drives, to the new and innovative Mealku, making sure those who have lost much are receiving home cooked meals. And of course there are so many others lending a hand and organizing volunteers: Red Cross, NYC Mayors office, New York Cares, Congregation Beth Elohim, Occupy Sandy, the Humane Society (leading pet search and rescue efforts), Staten Island Recovers, and of course The Salvation Army. If you are donating, please remember the victims in Haiti, whose suffering is all that much greater given its extremely impoverished state and particularly vulnerable to the effects of natural disasters and global warming. Please consider contributing to groups such as Direct Relief and International Medical Corps and Americares.

Most everyone I know is in some way in the trenches, whether by helping a family member or hard hit local business (like Rocky Sullivan’s in Red Hook – my friend, part owner, was there with a pump before realizing the task ahead was too great — he was able to keep himself safe but the bar/restaurant itself has suffered serious damage). (Please check out this NYT blog post if your small business was affected by the storm).  Others are rolling up their sleeves and coming from our of state to see what help still needs to be done. At Greenwood Cemetery, they’re busy removing the 150 trees that were destroyed during the storm, and restoring many broken monuments. Donations for that restoration are being accepted online.

Please let us know of other disaster relief efforts you are supporting, what people can do to help, and any useful links you may have. In the wake of so much destruction, the helping hands of others is the real source of recovery.

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Project EATS

I satisfied my herb search today at my local nursery, Shannon Florist, and supported a new-ish and innovative local business, Brooklyn Commune, and a non-profit organization that fosters urban growing, Project EATS at their plant and seedling sale. I came home with basil, a couple heirloom tomato plants (insurance in case my seeds don’t germinate and an opportunity to expand my varieties). I also brought home a couple small cucumber plants because I got wrapped up in a moment of gushing gardeners. The purple kale is because the lady from Project EATS (pictured below) was, wisely, offering sample tastes.  I also compared notes with several other visitors to the stand on what’s the best way to grow beets in Brooklyn (I was relieved to know I’m not the only one who has struggled to get them to grow, container or ground).  A lovely woman who I learned is a neighbor gave me a suggestion for using an empty kitty litter container for cucumbers.  (Ironically, the reason I’m looking to raise them off the ground is that there is a stray cat who prowls the yard so I want to keep them up, up and away but I don’t have much trellis space).  The sale started in the morning.  I got there around noon, and it still had a few hours to go.  I left with hands, but not arms, full. I was proud of myself for the restraint, given that I really wanted to snatch up every single one of those plants and soak in hours of the casual chatter, brimming with advice and anecdotes. But I left with just enough, and no more than I needed.

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Rain, Rain, Go Away

But until it does, let’s think about how to make it greener. These tips from Daily Dose of Fiber are a good start:

Eco-Friendly Rain Tips:

1. Collect rain water in a barrel and use this water to water your garden and grass!

2. Buy an eco-friendly rain coat (check out Patagonia).

3. Buy an eco-friendly umbrella for two.

4. Turn off your sprinklers when its raining.

From my own experience, I’ve found that indoor plants especially appreciate water imported from the great outdoors. Granted those of us in NYC may have rainwater that picks up pollution, but my informal research has found no indication that it’s enough to do any harm.

QUESTION: What ways have you found to incorporate green uses to springtime’s abundant rainfall? Go ahead … gimme the dirt!

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The Swap That Doesn’t Stop

All kinds of goodies pop up and surprise me.

I’m beginning to conceive a world where there are no stores, only trade markets.

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And where a very small business can go public without severe government intervention.

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And where voters decide how their tax dollars get spent.
And where citizens take to the streets or pull up their hoodies to stand up for their rights.

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And where flowers of communal gardens replace lonely urban lots.

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Hey, wait a minute.  I think I hear something… When the moon is in the seventh house

QUESTION: could it be that we’re in the Age of Aquarius? What are the signs? What are you seeing that we are doing better as a people than maybe ever before? Go ahead, folks, gimme the dirt! And keep on singing…let the sun shine in!

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Who’s Watching out for the Environment? Not Congress.

Who’s watching out for the environment?  Apparently, not our elected officials.  Courtesy of Environmental Defense Action Fund, last year saw the following assaults on the environment:

The U.S. House of Representatives voted seven times to dismantle the Clean Air Act…

There were 28 votes to weaken the Clean Water Act….

The House voted 191 times on bills or amendments to undermine pour health and environmental standards….

There were 84 votes to block actionstaht prevent pollution, and 114 votes targeting the EPA (the only federal agency that can take action on global warming).

Last year alone, Congress accepted over $40 million from the power industry lobby, and 22% of all votes taken in the House last year were to undermine environmental protections, roll back environmental laws and endanger public healthy.

Guess the lobbyists got their money’s worth.

Guess we have to do more.

Go to the link above.  If you can, make a donation.  If you can’t, or if you do, contact your legislators, and let them know that this year, you’re watching them.

Mina Mina Semolina

At the well-timed advice of a fellow reveler, I endeavored to work in a little semolina, a flour often reserved for pasta. I loosely followed a recipe I found on cookistry.blogspot.com (semolina-flax-honey bread) but I used a warmed milk and honey wash about five minutes before the bread was done baking to get a slightly darker crust.

Semolina is made from durum wheat, and is said to lighten otherwise heavy (usually as with whole grain) breads. It’s mighty tasty in this loaf, and I’m sure I will rendezvous with it again soon.

UPDATE: for the first time, I’ve posted a recipe online (down there, below the picture).  Hope you enjoy!  Feedback invited (nay, begged for).  Although I have a whole host of helpful cookbooks I frequently refer to, more and more I find myself borrowing from several reliable sites online.  For that reason, it’s important to me to have a recipe that’s clear, accurate, and gives proper due.  Let me know if you try this recipe (or some version thereof), and if this can be tweaked/improved at all.

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Here was my version of this great recipe from Cookistry.com (bounteous site for various bread recipes and bread making techniques).  My changes were largely due to simply running out of time since I was baking in between life, and other things.

Dry Ingredients
2 cups bread flour
slightly less than 1 cup semolina flour
1 teaspoon salt
2 1/4 teaspoons instant (quick rise) yeast
2 tablespoons ground flax

Wet Ingredients
2 tablespoons honey 2 (the original recipe calls for crystals – the liquid honey did fine for my purposes)
1 tablespoon olive oil + enough to coat a bag for the dough to rise
1 cup cold water (spring water, if you have it)

The Washes and Toppings
Egg wash (one whole egg and one tablespoon cold water)
Flax seeds, for topping (I used blonde – cookistry.com has a photo with one-half light, the other dark)
Milk wash (milk, honey, olive oil)

1. The Dough

Set aside the egg wash and flax seeds.  Put all the other ingredients except the water together in a food processor.  With your food processor on, pour the cold water in as fast as the other ingredients will absorb it.  Keep the food processor going until it forms a ball and then about another half-minute after that.

Take your dough ball out, and briefly knead it on a clean, floured surface (it always matters to knead your own dough, even if it’s just long enough to give it that human touch).  Form it back into a ball.

2.  The Rise

Oil the bag and put your dough ball in it, turning it to coat before putting it in cold storage overnight.

After the requisite twelve hours (mine turned out to be closer to 20), take the bag out and let it sit until it comes to room temperature.  (This should only take a couple hours — because of intermittent tasks, mine rested for closer to four hours).

3.  The Score and Wash

Sprinkle a baking sheet with cornmeal, and set the oven to 350 degrees.  Knead the dough briefly on a clean, floured surface and form it into the desired shape.  Place it on the baking sheet, cover it lightly with plastic wrap, and let it rise until doubled, about another 40 minutes (yes, for me this was closer to an hour).

To score your bread, take a sharp, thin kitchen knife, and make any desired slashes.  The pros use a lame.  I don’t have one of those and my scoring is satisfactory for me.  Sharp small serrated knives, or even razor blades, will do the trick to score the bread so that you have created a tear in the bread and the heat of the oven doesn’t just pick the weakest point and tear there.  Cookistry didn’t call for this but I nearly always score mine.  Hearth breads like this one, baked on a sheet, not in a bread pan, call for scoring but it’s typically not necessary for bread pans.  I do it anyone, sheet or pan, because I like the way it looks, it gives the crust peaks and valleys (not quite for mouthfeel but more for mouth experience).

For the egg wash, with a fork, briskly stir together one egg and one tablespoon cold water.  Using a pastry brush, brush the egg wash all over the bread, trying not to let any of it drip/run down the sides or pool in the scored indentations.

Generously sprinkle light flax seeds all over the tops and sides.

4.  The Bake

Pop it in the oven.

For the milk wash, which gets applied 5-10 minutes before your bread is done (closer to ten minutes if you want a darker crust since the sugars in the milk and honey darken the crust)After about 30-35 minutes, apply the milk wash, which is just a little bit of milk (approx. 1/4 cup) with a touch of honey (I heat these together in the microwave).  Then drizzle a little olive oil on top.  Give it a quick stir, then use the pastry brush to apply it, keeping in mind that you will get a bit of browning if the milk wash meets the bread at the bottom of the pan.  The little bit of crunch that results from this can be a pleasant surprise (but of course if left in the oven too long, it’s called burnt).  Experiment a little, and see what you like.  When your loaf is done, let it cool on a rack.

5.  The Eat

I especially like this bread toasted but keep that in mind when you’re shaping it or it may not be toaster friendly.  Lovely warm or just plain as a breakfast treat with a touch of butter.  The crust has a subtly sweet flavor, nicely accentuated by the nuttiness of the flax seeds.

Enjoy!

Hey Discovery Channel: AIR OUR MELTING PLANET!

Discovery Channel Doesn’t Want to Air Our Melting Planet: Sign the Petition to See the Horror Show

Go to Change.org to sign the petition.
Why This Is Important

The Discovery Channel has chosen not to air the full final episode of the much anticipated Frozen Planet series, written and produced by the same folks that brought us Blue Planet and Planet Earth, two staggeringly beautiful documentary series on the marvel that is our planet. The subject of the final series is global warming and climate change, and reflects on some effects of human impact on the natural world.

My friend David Baillie of WildCat Films, who worked as a cameraman on Frozen Planet, told me: “Over a 5 year period, I made 5 trips to Antarctica and one to the Arctic. In every location we saw and filmed clear evidence of retreating glaciers, disappearing permanent ice sheets and atypical weather patterns. We also had the privilege of working alongside scientists who now have years of incontrovertible evidence of a growing and catastrophic warming at both poles. Many of these scientists were funded by the US National Science Foundation so it seems perverse that Discovery is effectively censoring scientific research funded by the U.S. taxpayer.”

Discovery Channel prides itself on revealing the mysteries and unseen worlds of our planet. The Climate Change episode has the potential to move a lot of people, from one of the leading nations in global emissions, towards greater stewardship of this precious earth. This move acts in defiance of Discovery Channel’s original aims, which was to inspire the public about the world around them. The American public has a right to be inspired.

Please air the final episode of the Frozen Planet series.

Why People Are Signing
  • 6 days ago
    2 people like this reason

    You made it, show it. We can take it!

  • about 2 hours ago

    the truth from empirical data regarding climate change should not be censored, rather, highlighted!

  • about 2 hours ago

    We count on Discovery Channel to tell the truth and show the beauty of our wonderful world. People need to know the extent of the troubles we face in order to find solutions. Don’t let your U.S. audience down, please!

  • about 1 hour ago

    Please, let us see ALL the good work that’s been done!

  • about 1 hour ago

    To keep the final episode off the air is wholly dishonest. If you stand by your work you have nothing to fear from critics, and you will advance the debate all around.

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What? No End In Sight?

On a day like today, when I woke up with my stomach in my throat, my bed in a sea of quease, and my bowels grumbling, for a moment I considered wishing Harold Camping were right.  But, despite his promises, urges, calculations, and – when the world didn’t end in May as predicted – recalculations, today wore on with no sign of Armageddon approaching.  That is, unless, of course, you count all the signs that are cumulatively screaming that the end of the world as we know it is near.  Folks in the camp who say we are on the brink of TEOTWAWKI, as it is known in those circles, point to the following as indicators the end is coming fast: growing political and social unrestthe end of cash currency, stark economic disparity, increased natural disasters such as earthquakes (I’m granting here that the increase of earthquakes in particular is debatable), Hitchcockian “crazy, hairy ants” invading broad swathes of the southern United States, and the ever present threat of zombies (in Hollywood, and on Cracked.com anyway - but seriously this does appear on the list of end times signs of at least some doomsdayer soothsayers).

The inclusion of zombies in the broader apocalypse conversation appears to stem from the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s blog post in May 2011 (just days before May 21, Camping’s most advertised end-times target), “Preparedness 101: Zombie Apocalypse,” in which the CDC gave evacuation recommendations and other guidance for dealing with a natural disaster in the guise of what to do in the event of a zombie invasion.  The blog post was intended to garner attention to an otherwise (perceived) snooze fest of a topic — which it did, and crashed the site temporarily in the process.  The fact that this normally boringly straight-laced federal agency would seize on suspicion of an impending faux catastrophe and poke fun at the apocalyptic Paul Reveres, is a strong indicator that, even if you’re not a believer that the end is near, others are.  At the least, it sure feels like, as is said in that Buffalo Springfield song, “Something’s happening here.  What it is ain’t exactly clear.”  Or, as captured by a recent ironic Occupy Wall Street protestor and his hand-painted sign, “This is a sign.

So what do all these “signs” mean?  And if there really is no impending end ahead, why on earth does it feel so much like there is?  I could be the only one feeling like this, but anecdotal evidence suggests otherwise: witness the prepper/survivalist movement which seems to have grown out of post 9/11 fears of more terrorist attacks but in recent years has taken on a life of its own, at least in the blogosphere (case in point – each of the preceding word/s is linked to a different blog or article relating to the prepper/survivalist movement, with one in there just in case you want to friend the Facebook page dedicated to defeating zombies).

My guess is that all the hype is just practice for next year, when folks are really going to get bent out of shape about the more longstanding predictions that 12/21/12, where the Mayan calendar drops off, will usher in the Great Big End.  The 2012 prediction has been around much longer than the upstart Camping’s and his group Family Radio’s more recent threats, and since Hollywood has done nothing to assuage our fears (see, e.g., 2012, and a whole host of recent other cinematic what-if exploitations).  As we close out this year without any prophesied calamities setting in (other than the very real ones noted above), I’m betting that the growing swirl of doomsday rhetoric and sentiment, unhampered by global political and social rest, may all be just preface to the panic and disorder to be distributed in the fourteen months ahead.

As for these 2012 predictions, I believe that our fears have been collectively cast onto this quirk in human history that really doesn’t mean much.  Who knows why the Mayan calendar stops on 12/21/12?  It could be to test our faith in our own ability to carry on.  It could be an old Mayan joke, cast on unsuspecting heirs.  It’s possible the Mayans just got tired, and decided to take a little break and never got back to it.  If the Mayans were so smart, and were not just pulling a futuristic prank on us, and that date really represents the End, don’t you think they’d have given us a more of a heads-up on it?  I mean, at least they could’ve drawn a little fire and brimstone.  I admit that I have done no serious study of the matter (unless you count me being up tonight web-browsing serious) and that I do not have any background that gets me anywhere near expert status, but I do agree that, as some suspect, people have been reading way too much into this Mayan calendar matter.  I suspect that 12/21/12 will come and go like 05/21/11 without incidence other than a little egg on the face of some zealots.  (I recently read Cleopatra: A Life, by Stacey Schiff (Brown & Co. 2010), where I learned that ancient civilizations had to reset their calendars multiple times before getting it right, with varying resulting inconveniences, but none of them God’s wrath.)  Another viewpoint, that maybe I could get on board with, is that the end of the Mayan calendar has no apocalyptic consequences, per se, but that it might be a turning point in human history, much the way the birth of a white buffalo in Janesville, Wisconsin, in the 1990s was viewed by some Native American tribes and other people.

But the question remains, “why now?”  Why is it now that there is such a strong undercurrent of instability of the status quo.  Is it really coming from vague fear of what might happen with the Mayan calendar ending?  Is it really just the aftermath of unrestrained fear post 9/11?  Is it the real worry that we’re not going to be able to get ourselves out of the environmental messes we’ve put ourselves in?  Or is something more?  Is it, like the zombies that dance in the shadows of our fear and humor, other monsters of our own creation that are unpredictable and capable of taking on lives of their own?

Recently, I posted MIA: Mourning Jobs, a critique of Jobs’ failure to use his company’s power to create jobs in America and turn Apple into a paragon of social responsibility.  I wrote something in it that was ill-informed.  I commented, essentially, that technology had advanced and is advancing at such a dizzying pace that even technology itself can’t calculate that pace.  Since then, I have discovered Moore’s law, which, roughly stated, was the observation and prediction of Intel co-founder’s Gordon E. Moore, first appearing in print in Electronics Magazine in 1965, that the number of transistors that can be placed on an integrated circuit (or computer chip) inexpensively will double every two years.   Embedded in the theory of course is the recognition that there must be a limit to the trend, since it requires that the transistors get smaller and smaller.  They won’t just disappear.  Intel’s website identifies Moore’s law as the driving factor of the semiconductor industry, which is echoed by others who understand Moore’s law to have been a self-fulfilling prophecy since, as companies anticipated that their competitors would develop technologies in pace with the predicted trend, they pushed to get there first.  It seems widely accepted that, because of Moore’s law, devices have become more powerful and smaller.  The fact that I was able to write this and you are able to read it is just one minor example of the power of technology.

While we may daily witness the awe-inspiring capacity of modern computing, what we don’t see is that transistors on an integrated circuit are now so small that it would take 2,000 of them stacked on top of each other to reach the thickness of a strand of human hair.  Having gotten to this smaller (or nano) scale may make it possible for Moore’s law to continue since the roadblock just described (you can only get so much smaller and smaller until eventually you disappear) presumes the regular world of physics applies.  Once you get to a nano scale, however, the world of quantum mechanics, with rules much different than those of classical physics, applies.  In this world, for example, quantum particles like electrons can pass through thin walls even though they might not be able to break through the barrier.  This is known as quantum tunneling and has posed a challenge for engineers.  Another leg of the presumption that Moore’s law is bound to end is that it presumes the use of the transistor and integrated circuit, essentially, as we know them.  Already, I suspect that geeky worker bees are busy looking for the next wave of technology that might extend the application of Moore’s law by replacing such units.  (See, also, Ray Kurzweil’s law of accelerating returns).  And now we are smack in the world of scarily infinite possibilities.  The possibilities, of course, are about change.  And herein lies the fear.

The world is moving at such a dizzying pace, and shows no signs of slowing, that it appears some of the framework on which it is laid may need to change fundamentally, or even be overhauled, to accommodate the social, political and economic revolutions that are occurring.  This, my friends, is scary.  But change, too, is inevitable, and I have faith that it is within our means to guide that change for the greater good.  I have been a lucid dreamer virtually since I can remember.  Over a lifetime of talking to others on the subject of dreams, I recall someone once saying that death in dreams represents change.  Assuming this to be true, and there is a subconscious but not intellectual connection between change and death, it would be no wonder that these times leave so many people feeling like the end is near.

The white buffalo in Janesville was born just down the road from where I lived.  For weeks, I watched as people pulled up in their cars, vans and RVs from all across the country to witness the miracle, and be at the point where the crossroads appeared.  There were some people holding signs, encouraging each other to honor the miracle and to lead with peace.  When I was at Occupy Wall Street, I saw signs of love, and goodwill, along with the others telling people like me who make my living working for the big bad banks to jump out the window.  I’m hoping that we embrace the change we’re witnessing as an opportunity to take the high road, and not succumb to the stresses of modern times.

Well, I’d like to continue to wax poetic on the presence of the various predictions and interpretations, but I have to go nurse my flu and may only have three minutes remaining to post this anyway.  Count down, post commenced 9:50 p.m., ending 11:57 p.m.

Revel on, fellow revelers, wherever tomorrow takes you.

post script: 10/22/11, 3:42 a.m.  Welcome to the other side of fear.

Keeping It Green

Maybe I was a little harsh.  My last report on my bi-weekly CSA pick up pointed out the meagerness of some of the offerings.  I’ve been noting all summer the harsh effects of climate change (f/k/a global warming) on home gardeners across the country.  According to an email that I received this week, re-posted below, we are not alone.  Larger local growers, as well, have felt the impact of unpredictable weather this season, which has run the gamut from drought to flooding, and has resulted in various pests brought in on the winds of Irene, blight, rot, increased sick days and low worker morale.  I just wanted to take a minute to say that I do try to give a fair and accurate picture of this – my first – CSA experience, but it doesn’t always capture the whole picture.  This is why I have invited others to tell me their stories, share their experiences, suggest additional alternasources, and, now, why I am forwarding the (very thoughtful) message I received a couple days ago from the organizers of my CSA and the farmers who grow some of the pretty awesome food I’ve been eating this summer.

Recently at a farmers market in Fort Greene, I saw signs from GrowNYC calling for donations to help organic/local farmers whose crops were damaged or wiped out by Hurricane Irene.  Their efforts are still underway.  One of their suggestions for how to help, in addition to direct donations, is to commit to eat locally as much as possible in September (the “locavore challenge”).  I’m encouraging all of you/us to continue this commitment through the end of the year, since it will take more than a month’s effort to help the farmers recover losses from a season screwed up by the environmental mess that we’re in.  Please share your stories here and beyond about what you are doing to participate in an extended locavore challenge (if the Occupy Wall Street protesters aim to make it through the winter, so can we).  Updates ahead on ways I’ve been putting my CSA treats to work.  Please pass along your recipes, suggestions, etc., on where/what/how to advance the local-eating agenda.

Here’s the email….

Chris and Eve have sent an update about the difficulties they’ve experienced this growing season, which I’ve shared below. We’ll be sending everyone an end-of-season survey later on, but if you have any feedback to pass on to the farmer before then, feel free to email the core group at kwtcsa@gmail.com.

Stacy,

On behalf of the KWT CSA core group

From the farmers:


This has been a challenging last couple of months and although we were not wiped out by the hurricane the amount of rain has been a huge issue affecting the quality of many crops.  Not just with organic growers, as conventional farmers in the northeast are experiencing similar challenges and losses.

Under the circumstance we try to stay optimistic about the situation. All seasons are different and rarely are they void of conditions at some time that will have an impact on quality, quantity or diversity.    Farms in the northeast can be impacted by one or more problems like pests, drought, disease, flooding or other issues  outside of the farmers control.   Other farms even 100 miles away may have a totally different growing experience in a season.

I met with Cornell cooperative extension today to seek professional help (as I do throughout the season) regarding three different crop disease issues  and one pest issue tied directly to the wet weather.  They believed the steps that we had taken were sound and accurate given the tools we have under the national organic standards.  I also learned about the vast damage and loss of  crops in our region to conventional farmers who can use chemicals as a tool.  That didn’t make me feel better; I just wished conditions were better.

In conclusion, we are disappointed that we were struck with tomato blight this year,  that we have received almost double our annual rainfall total (most of which in the last month and a half),  that we were hit with damaging hurricane winds and pests and insects that were transported with winds.  What does this mean for crops:

Cracking and rotting of root crops like sweet potatoes, carrots, potatoes and carrots.  Tomato quality and loss due to blight which kills the plant and cracking and rotting due to excessive rain.  This means we have to throw out a lot of produce.  Heavy rain and pooling of water leads to leaf disease on all kale, collards, cabbage, broccoli, head lettuce, beans beets and many more.  In extreme cases plant roots can suffocate leading to the plant wilting to the ground.  That has happened to broccoli, kale and Brussels sprouts.  Seedlings that wilt off or get damaged by heavy winds and pounding rains.  Seeding schedules get thrown off because the ground is too wet to work.  Cultivation and weeding schedules are difficult to maintain.  Farm help doesn’t want to work and morale is affected and sick days increase.

These are some of the issues that are a result of the extreme weather we are experiencing.  We don’t like some of the challenges it has created and we feel grateful that it wasn’t worse for us and our csa members.

Thanks,

chris
QUESTION: And you?  What will you do to keep it green?  Go ahead … gimme the dirt!

Taking it to Another Level: fellow blogger learns the secrets of grow lights and water ways

Hello fellow revelers,

Just wanted to share a recent post from a fellow gardening blog, Gardening in the Boroughs of NYC.  I met the author at the recent Big BK Seed, Etc., Exchange.  I love this description of how she went to a lecture on hydroponic farming, which was informative but only served to even further pique her curiosity on the subject.  Instead of setting down her pen and checking off the lecture as another thing done on her list of to-dos, she dug in deeper, and farmed for a way to learn more.  She wound up with an internship to learn the deeper ins and outs of hydroponic farming with Boswyck Farms of Bushwick. 

The post is a good reminder of the virtue in each of us, individually and collectively, to roll up our sleeves, dig in the dirt, learn the earth and its resources, explore new methods of doing, telling what we’ve learned and sharing, to the best of ability, our means to do more with less. 

Revel reading, y’all!

http://nycgardening.blogspot.com/2011/09/hydroponic-farm-intern.html